PRESS
2006 - presentNext >> 
Using a baton as a weapon of seduction
El Universal, Caracas - Jun. 12, 2013

Eduardo Marturet, Music Director of The Miami Symphony Orchestra, signs with CAMI
MISO Press Release, Miami - Oct. 25, 2012

Miami Symphony Orchestra's Maestro Eduardo Marturet Honored With Medal Of Merit By The U.S. Congress In Washington, D.C. - Read more.
MISO Press Release, Washington DC - Apr. 24, 2012

An 18th century Red Priest meets a 20th century Tango master on a fresh, new recording celebrating "The Four Seasons" recorded with Eduardo Marturet and The Simon Bolivar Youth Orchestra of Venezuela. Click for the full article on MPR.
MPR, Minneapolis - Apr. 21, 2009

Under Marturet's leadership, the orchestra has made great strides. The violin section has grown into a cohesive group and a chief asset, with rich, gleaming tone. Lower strings are less steady with cellos, in particular, needing upgrading. Woodwinds and brass have some talented members but remain uneven as sections, with horns notably wobbly Saturday night. Even so, under Marturet's hyperkinetic direction, the Miami Symphony served up a rich-textured, graceful, and often very exciting performance of Dvorak's symphony. Marturet judged the music's ebb and flow masterfully, giving the melodies the requisite lift throughout. The middle movements had the pastoral qualities, and Marturet drew out the final lyrical section warmly, allowing the brassy headlong coda to make a brilliant impact.
Miami Herald, Miami - Apr. 3, 2007

The Miami Symphony, from exquisite to dancing. This orchestra has a polished knowledge of this kind of music as the orchestra has offered Viennese music for the past 18 years. There was so much applause that Marturet and the orchestra played four encores that delighted an increasingly enthusiastic audience. Not even Vienna does it better, nor does the audience enjoy it as much.
El Nuevo Herald, Miami - Feb. 1, 2007

Neither can we forget the first two concerts of the Miami Symphony's new season, now with maestro Eduardo Marturet not only as conductor, but as music director as well. Marturet has included new works in the repertoire and featured very young and talented solo performers, such as Time for Three, with whom he gave us in December one of the great concerts of 2006.
El Nuevo Herald, Miami - Dec. 28, 2006

Marturet and the musicians from the Miami (Symphony) enjoyed themselves during the Symphony No. 9 (from the New World) by Dvorak...A demostration of excellence and dedicated work from the first to the last note...Again, a sold out house gave them a long and well deserved standing ovation.
El Nuevo Herald, Miami - Feb. 21, 2006

He has already gained respect and admiration from the Miami public. His style is agile, mercurial and "electric" at times. Marturet gives Mozart that youthful dimension which many forget.
El Nuevo Herald, Miami - Jan. 19, 2006

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The Challenge of Excellence by Eduardo Marturet (135 KB)
 Motivated by a series of reflections spanning my career as Orchestral Conductor, I have tried for the past 30 years to stay in touch with my colleagues, the musicians with whom I work on a daily basis with the desire to continue perfecting and evolving our noble art. Paradoxically, as these artistic differences between the European and Latin American orchestras are confirmed, we also find that the latter (orchestras) are usually much more involved, demonstrating increased interest and mysticism in their professional endeavors. It is because of this degree of enthusiasm demonstrated by my colleagues that I have decided to pursue these ideas in order to share with them the possibility of turning the Latin American symphonic dream into a reality.

The Farewell Soundtrack by Leonardo Padrón (28 KB)
I have always liked to think that, if the soul has a sound, it is music. There is something otherworldly about music; it is so laden with wind, with mystery and, at the same time, with so much humanity. Aldous Huxley once said that, after silence, music is the closest thing to expressing the inexpressible. That is why music cannot be told. Words are merely a severe, uninspired instrument for doing so. That is why I feel uneasy about trying to convey the significance of the soundtrack that Eduardo Marturet composed for Diego Rísquez’s movie about one of the women most representative of Latin American courage: Manuela Sáenz.

Interview from Horizons Magazine by Emilio Lovera by Federico García (45 KB)
“We must understand and be willing to accept that a Latin American orchestra will never sound like an European one. Never!”

Eduardo Marturet: The Philharmonic's Next Guest by Cecilia Scalisi (28 KB)
The future of music is that we are going through a transitional stage of great historical transcendence in the evolution of the musical scenario.

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